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Spire Leeds Hospital at the forefront of MRI imaging technology – with the help of a 40 tonne crane!

Having successfully coped with the challenges of Covid-19 pandemic throughout the year, including supporting Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust by providing diagnostic tests, surgical care and treatments to hundreds of NHS patients, Spire Leeds Hospital recently navigated a new challenge – this time it was one of logistics!

 

The Hospital took delivery of a new state-of-the-art MRI scanner last Friday and the installation of the huge 4 tonne system threw up some daunting challenges. The equipment was so large an exterior brick wall had to be partially knocked down before the scanner could be moved into its new home in the radiography department. The existing scanner first had to be removed through the 2 metres x 2 metres opening made in the brick wall before its replacement could be lowered into the imaging department, using specialist lifting equipment and a 25-metre crane.

 

The addition of the new system is all part of a programme of investments the Hospital is making to improve patient services in 2021 and will position Spire at the forefront of imaging technology. It will increase the type of tests on offer to patients and also improve the patients’ experience as well as those with claustrophobia.

 

Susan Downing, MRI Team Lead said, “Spire Leeds prides itself on providing quality MRI Imaging and a compassionate and timely service for its MRI patients. The new scanner will increase the type of tests we can offer and improve the patient experience, especially for those with claustrophobia. With the latest clinical software and hardware and a larger bore size (hole) it will make a dramatic difference to both the patient experience and the imaging quality.

 

The larger bore hole in the middle makes is vital to how the scan feels, which usually means that some patients who may have struggled previously due to claustrophobia will find it much easier to complete their examinations with less stress. The scan will perform some tests more quickly so patents will not need to keep still for a long period of time. It could also negate the need for sedation for some patients, with the benefit of not impinging on their normal workday activities.”

Spire Leeds performs between 4,000 and 4,500 scans per year for most specialties, including MSK, neurology, vascular, breast, oncology, hepatobiliary, paediatrics and gynaecology. Now, for the first time this new equipment will enable specialist radiographers to perform cardiac imaging using intelligent monitoring of the patient’s heart rhythms. Susan said, “Spire has the advantage of having a very experienced MRI team that have undergone scanner replacement and training on new systems previously. We are perfectly placed to make full use of our training and clinical knowledge and apply it to this new system.

The new cardiac imaging availability at Spire means that if a patient is seeing a cardiologist here, there is more continuity of care as they will not have to go elsewhere for this imaging. Cardiac MRI can access heart tissue, for example looking for damage to heart muscle post heart attack. We can inspect heart valves for leaks and check for infection or inflammation. We can image the heart whilst it is in motion and therefore get functional information for the heart valves and access the heart wall’s function following infection or heart attack. There is no radiation with MRI and cardiac MRI is also used to assess elite athletes to check for anomalies.”

As part of the refurbishment the radiography department has been redesigned to make it feel less clinical and more private. The scan room itself will have mood lighting which the patient will be able to choose prior to their scan, including warm, cosy lighting for grey days and cool and calming for the summertime.  A special headset enables patients to listen to music and radio podcasts. There are communication systems in the room for interaction between the patient and the radiographer and CCTV allows room round observation of the patient. Refurbishments also involved the replacement of RF equipment, involving lining the entire scanning room with copper, which safeguards radio frequencies from entering the area.

Other logistical challenges during the refurbishments programme included providing an interim MRI service on a mobile trailer outside the Hospital in the middle of winter and a global pandemic.

The Siemens 1.5 Tesla ‘SOLA’ system should be available for patients from the middle of January 2021.